Fort Robinson, Nebraska, Arrival

At one time, it housed 12,000 cavalry horses and 4,000 mules. The next two days, mules Brick and Cracker are calling it home. We have arrived at Fort Robinson, Nebraska.

Fort Robinson arrival: 127 days after riding out our western North Carolina front gate, we arrived at the old Cavalry Remount station.

Brick and Cracker have traveled 120-plus miles in the last 5 days so they’re ready for 2 days off. The folks at Fort Robinson have been super putting us up. The plan now is to post some photos of the week then head out Tuesday morning toward Lusk, Wyoming.

Here are some photos of our Fort Robinson arrival. I’m working up some great posts you’ll enjoy. Now, though, it’s time for grass for the mules and coffee for the man.

Photos of Fort Robinson and Environs

Nebraska? Yep, Nebraska. And you just thought it was corn. Me too….
Brick and Cracker on their final approach to Fort Robinson. In the background, butttes, a sure sign we’re entering the American West.
Welcoming Committee: the mules and I showed up with no hay, grain or feed. That changed within minutes of our arrival. Thanks to (L to R) Duly Zwiefel, Marilyn Palmer, Renee Miller and Sandee McKee for putting grub in the mules’ and my belly! Duly, Marilyn, Renee and Sandee hail from Iowa.
Our quarters for the night: the old cavalry stables.
We’re here! Brick has a dazed look on her face. It’s the first stall I’ve had her in since I’ve owned here. She was much more relaxed…. (Mark Ribble photo)
…the next morning munching grass with her new bunny buddy.
Cracker surveys his new digs.
Backdrop to Fort Robinson: a new land to explore.

Great Big Thanks to:

4 Responses to Fort Robinson, Nebraska, Arrival

  • You need to put more sunscreen on your nose but you take great pictures. I really love the one of brick and the bunny.

    • I know. I’m using that white zinc stuff on my nose. Every day. Clearly more is needed. Happy to hear you like the Brick and Bunny pic. I saw the bunny again this morning.

  • About the bunny: I have to wonder how it decides that a mule is not a foe? Probably it has no experience with mules or equines in general. Maybe cows? Or does it use other cues to determine that its safe to approach? Like the head-down-feeding cue, that signals “herbivore”? Or the totally absence of reaction on the part of the mule? Because Brick has surely seen large numbers of rabbits, hedgehogs, field mice, etc. close to her muzzle, and would be conditioned not to be wary.

    Anyway, the mind ponders…

    C

    • Christian, with all due respect, you are not thinking of the bunny. That particular rabbit lives at Fort Robinson where he/she would have seen horses on a fairly regular basis and perhaps even a mule…habituation. That being said I also think that pray animals and grazing animals give off a totally different vibe from one another in their behavior that all other animals including humans are pretty good at interpreting quickly.

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